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Three Ways To Grow Your Practice Podcast

Sep 24th, 2021

This week, I’d like to bring to you an interesting interview with our special guest who managed to successfully grow one of the biggest medical centres in New South Wales.

In this special OMD TV guest interview podcast episode, Mr Suraj Gandha, managing director of Broadmeadow Medical Centre discussed “Three Ways to Grow Your Medical Practice in a Scalable Way ”

This is part of our special Covid Success Stories series, where OMD TV will feature interviews with clinics that successfully pivoted and thrived through the tough times like the Covid 19 Pandemic presented.

In this podcast interview, we examined…

  • What are the most challenging things the clinic has faced?
  • What strategies they have implemented in order to keep their staff and the patients safe?
  • How to bring in more doctors to a team?
  • How to remain nimble and flexible with all these changes over the course of the years running their practice?
  • How to generate more new patients to keep your doctors busy

Hope you’d enjoy and learn a lot from this episode.

Show Notes

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Hi, I'm Huyen
Our work (and this site) is devoted to sharing ideas, tools and resources that will help you automate, grow and scale your practice.

huyen

Learn More

PODCAST TRANSCRIPT

Steven Tait:

Welcome to the OMD TV and Podcast Show.

The place to be to grow and scale your business.

Through our show, we like to give our audience some tips and strategies, the successful ways that they can use to grow and scale their business.

We also like to share success stories of people in the industry, who are generating more referrals, more patients, more income, more revenue, more profit.

Huyen Truong:

Today, we have a special guest on our show Mr Suraj Gandha, Co-Founder and Managing Director of Broadmeadow Medical Centre and the topics we're going to discuss today is "Three Ways To Grow Your Medical Practice In A Scalable Way." And Suraj is running actually one of the biggest medical centres in New South Wales which was founded 21 years ago and an interesting fact is that Suraj is not a medical doctor or surgeon the is a strategic management consultant. So, it's very exciting for us to hear from a different perspective today as to what it takes to grow and scale a medical centre, which is one of the most difficult types of business to scale.

This particular show is part of our special COVID Success Stories series where we feature interviews with clinics that have successfully pivoted and strived through the tough times like the recent COVID-19 pandemic. So, thank you for listening to our show and welcome Suraj to our show.

Steven Tait:

I mean, we're excited to have you on the show and hear about your journey not just through COVID but also in your history as running your practice.

Now, first, I mean, for our audience here who doesn't know a lot about you please tell us

a little bit more about you and your clinic.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Sure, yeah, I don't have a medical background, I've got a Computer Engineering background.

So,

I did that in Uni, became a product engineer for Telstra and then a Process Engineer went and did some more and then a Process Engineer went and did some more Uni work and became a consultant. So, I was a Business Consultant in the tax area for about 10 years here and in America as well and after that, I came back and had a bit of okay, what am I doing with my life?

Steven Tait:

Sure.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Yep, and then went into New South Wales Health. So, I was consulting and working with them in their patient transport area for many years. And that was over a period of around 20 years and on the side, I was working with the Broadmeadow Medical Centre kind of that got put together. My dad was a GP and he had a couple of business associates as well.

One was another GP, one had opened clinics before and so he said, all right, Suraj, I've got a job for you. You know, we need to have a Medical Centre in Newcastle here are the guys that you can do it with go forth and do it.

Steven Tait:

Running.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Running and starting running. Yeah.

Steven Tait:

Great.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

In the meantime, I was getting my Uni Degree and then work throughout the whole period as well. So, it was always a bit of a sideline affair and it started very small. It started with three practitioners, the building itself used to be originally was a service station and then it became a fast-food outlet Henny Penny. Don't know if you've got Henny Penny in Sydney? It's like a poor man's KFC.

Steven Tait:

I'm not aware of it.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Right, yeah, not surprised.

So, the building was triangular to have a drive-through and have petrol pumps and all the rest of it and over the years as we've grown, we've had to put additions on. So, the first addition was a second level then we put another section at the back and then another level on top of that. So, it's kind of organically grown as we've needed the space. Yeah, and then a few years ago I got an opportunity, my wife got an opportunity to move to Japan for four years for work and so I left my job at New South Wales Health and was able to focus on the business more than I ever have and it's the best thing I've ever done.

Steven Tait:

Great.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Yeah, it was wonderful.

Steven Tait:

Great and so what type of services do you offer?

Mr Suraj Gandha:

We've got GPs, so we've got 10 GPs, we've got allied health who are tenants.

So, we've got pathology, we've got physio, we've got a pharmacy. We don't have a radiology

because of power constraints in the building.

Steven Tait:

Sure.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

But you know, we’re working hard for that.

Steven Tait:

Sure.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

And we've got no more space at the moment.

So, in terms of what do we offer standard GP clinic service offerings.

Being in Newcastle, we do a lot of workplace pre-employment medicals and that's becoming more and more important part of their business and revenue stream. And we also have an older population there in the area that we're situated, so we do a lot of kind of medication reviews and health plans.

Steven Tait:

Great.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Yeah, care plans.

Steven Tait:

Okay, now there's been no greater sort of factor on businesses and on the broader community then obviously the Coronavirus Pandemic over the last couple of years.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Yeah.

Steven Tait:

How did that affect you and your practice?

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Greatly, obviously.

Look, a Medical Centre is a good business to be in any situation they're kind of very resilient. So,

when this first kicked off probably late Feb last year 2019, the question was how do we keep our doors open and keep our staff and doctors from getting Coronavirus? There was no vaccine in the imminent future and so we still had patients who need to come in for a variety of reasons. We've had virtually no cases in the Hunter region except for a couple of Sydney-siders who would come up.

Steven Tait:

Sure.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

So, to achieve those two goals we did a few things.

First thing, obviously we put someone on the front desk taking temperatures, asking questions. The second thing we did was increase our cleaning regime increase the amount of PPE we're wearing which was a real challenge to get enough PPE in.

Steven Tait:

Especially in the early days.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Oh, yeah, we were ordering in bulk from all over the world, really?

To get it in some back channels. And the best thing we did was we hired a demountable building and we fitted it out to be a respiratory clinic. So, if anyone looked a little bit suspicious, cough or runny nose or shortness of breath, any of the symptoms goes straight there it was manned by a nurse and a doctor in full biohazard equipment, they'd do a Coronavirus swab and we had no positives. But we've done a lot of tests, we partnered with some pathology companies to get those tests done as quickly and cheaply as we can. And the fact that we set that up immediately and no one else did it in our area allowed us that first-mover advantage. So, we were then able to take on so many more patients and in terms of the goodwill to our brand, it was amazing. A couple of clinics closed down and they referred their patients to us and we worked very closely with them.

Steven Tait:

Fantastic.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Yeah, so we've been able to grow our practice through that and remained resilient but everything became slower, you know.

Steven Tait:

Sure, the challenges. The challenges of getting supply, getting stuff.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Yeah, and Telehealth was the other thing, Telehealth ramped up a lot. Had you offered Telehealth before? We had, but all due respect to GPs they're kind of reluctant to adopt new technology. I think younger GPs are more open but all the GPs the primary focus is I do not want to cause any harm and if you have a patient you want to be able to look at them and touch them, and to really be able to diagnose them correctly. If you don't, there's a big risk of misdiagnosis and yeah, you don't want to do that. And so, understanding, okay, what are the boundaries that are GPs are comfortable with? What are the boundaries of technology? What sort of other scopes of activities we can do was a big step and now everyone's on board.

Steven Tait:

Well, which is sort of the next question that was your very successful reaction to it and like we tell all our viewers is being nimble and flexible, and being able to adapt quickly seemed obvious to have a great sort of effect for you and your business.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Yeah.

Steven Tait:

What is staying in place moving forward and what do you see as sort of the aspects that you're going to keep in relation to this?

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Good question, being nimble often comes from a problem that you're faced with or being, being more reactive, not necessarily proactive sometimes. So, a lot of the solutions we came up with are trial and error to get to where we are. I think the things we're going to stick with telehealth for sure. We learned how to churn our patients a bit quicker, because we don't want people sitting in the waiting room. Before it wasn't necessarily a factor. One of the things we did to reduce patient, not necessarily patient wait time but the perception that people are waiting is we offered free Wi-Fi.

Steven Tait:

Right.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Now it's not, this is not the first time it's being offered, right?

A few years ago, but people stopped complaining.

Steven Tait:

Right.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Because they just got on their phones and…

Steven Tait:

Away they went.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Hey, it's something free.

Steven Tait:

They're distracted.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Distracted, so now instead of waiting 20 minutes and getting angry you're halfway through article or game or whatever, why are you bothering me, can I finish this first? Yeah, so tools to churn patients through a bit better. Proactive SMSing has been pretty good, so if we're running late, you know, your doctor is running 10 minutes late, don't come in for that.

Steven Tait:

Right.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

And the respiratory clinic, we've talked over the last three or four months about getting rid of it, do we need it? And we decided, you know, it's a pretty good addition. Yeah, I think it costs us 400 bucks a month to hire it.

Steven Tait:

Sure.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

So, it's nothing but when flu season comes around, we shuffle people through there, there are less people sniffing, and unwell in the practice. And should this thing ever rise up again then.

Steven Tait:

Sure. You're prepared.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

We're ready to go.

Huyen Truong:

With something like coronavirus, how does something like that so variable affect your vision for your clinic in five or 10 years? Will you still be able to long term strategise?

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Yeah, look, strategies change, right?

Yeah, everyone's got a plan until they get punched in the face.

Steven Tait:

Sure.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

And so, I think you have to set those targets and those goals.

For us, five years looks like we've got a few older practitioners who are going to move out. So, we're happy with the way our practice is running from an admin side view. Our IT infrastructure needs improving probably going to the Cloud, which changes, this is more back-end stuff but you know, that's a significant change for us which will be good and welcomed. Because then we don't have to worry about our server going down as long as we've got an internet link, we're good to function. But the five-year plan is to get younger doctors, new young doctors in to replace those doctors who are going to churn out by natural attrition. So, the strategy for that we've tried all sorts of things to recruit doctors over the years from poaching good doctors in nearby clinics. A very good source is asking for a referral from our existing GPs, do you have any colleagues or anyone who would want to come and work for us? And then you have to work on your value proposition, so what makes this a good place? Why should a doctor work here rather than somewhere else? We've incentivised our staff so we'll give you a bonus if you can get a new doctor in but one of the most effective ways is through training, getting a registrar and you get a doctor who's on a rotation, they come through and spend some time in the clinic more often than not they'll stay and that's the really exciting part because they change the culture and they change the dynamic.

And if they try it and they choose to come back and we choose to have them back, it just creates a really good collegial atmosphere I think and you get like a generational spectrum, so doctors of all ages from very new to the very old and that's been important. Recruiters as well, we've never recruited a doctor through a recruiter but we've approached them a few times. We never saw the value in it from a cost perspective but there is value in it, it's kind of 20-25,000 upfront but that gets recouped. But we haven't had the need to do that.

Steven Tait:

Sure.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

15-year vision.

Huyen Truong:

That's a long time.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Well, we'll run out of space, right?

So, I want to knock the building down and build a big building there.

Steven Tait:

Right.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

And then put a medical practice, put maybe some aged care facilities up the top, maybe a day hospital, a real Medical Centre. The precinct itself we're in is transforming and yeah, that's the 15 years.

Steven Tait:

Because you are also, I guess servicing a much wider audience than you were when you first started out sort of 21 years ago. That area, the people, the needs, it's probably changed quite dramatically.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

It has, yeah, particularly the Aged Care landscape, that's changed a lot.

Workplace wise Newcastle's still is not as industrial as it was 21 years ago and as people realise what a fantastic place it is, more people are moving there. The university is growing so you get a younger group there that affects us because we're kind of nearby. But yeah, I think we've just shifted, people see a GP because they're not feeling well. People stay with the GP because it their family doctor, it's someone you can trust. So, it's up to the GPs to a large degree to build that relationship and it's up to us to make the experience as painless as possible. You see people now, back in the day when my dad was a GP in a small clinic people would wait happily for two hours. Yeah, sit there, no complaints there's, you know, magazines on the coffee table. This is what it is, this is what a GP is. And now, you see, I get annoyed if I'm feeling a bit unwell get online, I've got to wait an hour to see a doctor, right? To make that for booking and then I turn up there after five minutes I'm like, what are these guys doing?

Steven Tait:

Our attention spans have changed.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Yeah, so catering to that, that's been a bigger change than anything else, I think.

Steven Tait:

Well, going back to your point around scaling, using doctors and just growing doctors who obviously help you sort of bring in more people, offer different services, those types of things. Do you have any other sort of ideas around how you've effectively scaled your practice, other strategies that you use?

Mr Suraj Gandha:

I think from my technology point of view that's been a big factor for us.

When you talk scale, I mean, you can get more patients in through the door but that's not ever been a problem for us I think because we are located in a good place, we're a big building, there's lots of parking, it's easy to get to and we've always had good doctors and staff. So, people have wanted to come to us. The problem for us is how do we manage the demand. And it's things like, okay, digitising all our files, it's things like improving outpatient checking system, it's things like we need another room, let's get rid of all of that paper files and make another two consulting rooms which project took two years and the doctors weren't happy at the time because they like to have their paper file do their read-through yeah, but it's those things have changed in terms of we used to do advertising in, we used radio a lot, we used billboards, someone even tried to get us to advertise in a cinema once, which we didn't do. Because I was thinking, okay, I'm sitting there in a theatre and there's a doctor are they gonna change my thing? No, probably not.

Steven Tait:

Maybe. Who knows.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

What we found really effective was our own Facebook page.

So that Wi-Fi I was talking about before to check-in, you've got to check in on Facebook. So, then you've got to be a friend of our clinic and then we just once a week push out something or other. And we've also got an online booking system called HotDoc which is really good. Big plug for that, well done.

Steven Tait:

Great.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

That's important.

Steven Tait:

Do they appreciate it.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Yeah, look they've done a great job through this whole pandemic in reacting very quickly and creating tools that have helped us. But they push a lot out through our Google presence and just passively sitting back and stopping pretty much every channel except the free announcements on Google and Facebook it's just grown people have come from that and HotDoc has been good in terms of they've done a lot of research about when the most effective time to advertise for certain types of services. So, skin cancer checks, skin checks probably January, that's if you'd put an ad out in January everyone's already been out in the sun for a couple of months and they're like, I'm worried about that. Cervical screening, for some reason in April, that's the most effective time.

Huyen Truong:       

So, you have a content plan in place throughout the years when it comes to certain seasons and certain diseases or illnesses?

Mr Suraj Gandha:

They have a plan and we kind of just leverage off that.

Huyen Truong:       

So interestingly, I met you at a golf course and after our initial conversation I found out you were running a medical centre and you have some time for golf. So, you must have done really well in terms of managing and scaling your clinic. So, we talked about one way to scale the clinic which is to add more doctors and maintain them and keep them happy. So, have you got any long-term incentive planned to keep your doctors in your management team engaged and stay with you for a longer-term?

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Good question, that's the challenge, isn't it?

Yeah, so the answer is what do we offer that would retain them? We offer flexibility, so each GP is free to run their own practice as they want. If you look at the IPNs in the bigger clinics, you know, you are kind of more bound into certain methodologies even certain billing methodologies at times. We like to treat all of our GPs and all their nurses as well as if they're running their own practice and so they've got the flexibility to focus on a certain product. We've got women's health specialists, we've got skin specialists who all do GP work as well but this is a niche area that they're interested in and so we offer whatever we can in terms of support on our website, in terms of if you want a specialist skin nurse to come and assist you then we've acquired them. So that's one way to do it the culture is the other, so keeping people engaged and happy and working as a family. So, the weekly doctors meeting is a very important part of our practice. They get together and talk about first, general issues in the practice, second, any problem cases and then they start it becomes an academic exercise. Unfortunately, during COVID our staff meetings have dropped off because we've been smashed by phone calls and appointments. And so, we've lost a few staff over the last month just through burnout and it's hard to manage that because you can't, even if you pay them more it doesn't matter, what you can only take so much, right?

Steven Tait:

I don't think this pandemic has affected anyone as greatly as it affected the medical community, they've borne the whole weight of the whole process.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Yeah, and I guess patients don't understand that.

You don't come to a medical clinic because you're feeling really great about yourself, you come there because you're not feeling well, you got a problem. And you can take it out on a staff member but they've I mean, our staff have just done the most amazing job, but how do we retain them? Good question, now we're faced with the problem. We've got a whole bunch of new staff so, how do we train them? And because we've never had this many staff or this much inexperience at one time, and it turns out our training materials are lacking and are outdated so we need to focus, that's our focus right now is to get a really repeatable process in place and not detailed checklists, not detailed manuals about how do you book a patient in but more high-level checklists about the methodology because the systems will change and the processes will change. But it's imbuing this certain methodology in people which is a real challenge, so not sure how to do that. We'd like to do maybe some video stuff. We've got a couple of girls who we just hired, who are former flight attendants and no medical experience, not much reception experience but if you're working in an airline and you know, that's a pretty.

Steven Tait:

You've dealt with a lot of people.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

And a lot of situations, you're used to okay, what happens when the cabin is filled with smoke and you've got to get everyone out in 30 seconds? And it's been interesting hiring people from different areas, that has kept the staff mix fresh and now everyone's looking at problems differently and some of the feedback they've been on board for about a month so I interviewed them the other day and said, what's it been like? They said, there's 50 ways to do things. You ask someone and they'll say do it this way, someone else will do it this way someone else will do it this way. So, we need to, which is a good and a bad thing, right? So, we need to have some workshops, bring it all together and as a group say this is how we're going to do this and then document it and make it a repeatable process for training for next time people come on board. So, in terms of scaling your clinic, you need to not spend time on things like this too often, you need to get good processes in place, particularly training processes because your staff keep the whole thing going and to be able to roll them out quickly and just get on with other stuff because there's always something else.

Steven Tait:

Indeed.

Huyen Truong:

So, this is just a side question I have for you.

Have you ever thought of the exit plan or you know, selling your business in the future because at some point in your life you've got to think about what I want to do something else and running a medical centre for so many years is a challenge and so have you thought of things that you can do to make your business more sellable in the future?

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Yeah, we've been approached a lot of times actually.

Because we're big and we're attractive in terms of everything we've got to offer. The question always comes down to what would you do with that money, right? Not that I've got so much money it's not a problem but this is a very good source of income as the building owner, I'm a partner in this business but the building is mine so it gives you some security at least that the rents gonna get paid and as a day-to-day management thing, we've got a practice manager in there, full time and she runs the day to day really well. So, in terms of the amount of effort that you have to put in now, certainly after being involved with it for two decades you understand, okay, what needs to happen? I'm not going to make the training plan, right? We'll facilitate that through someone else. So, in terms of the value for money, in terms of my time effort and the return we get, why would I sell it?

Huyen Truong:    

Your business is running well right now, you still have passion for that and you still want to contribute to your local community.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

How do you make it more sellable, that is the other part.

Huyen Truong:

Yeah, to increase the value of your practice.

Is that's something and have you ever thought of removing yourself from running day to day, you're not really running day to day operation anymore but have you thought about removing yourself and have a management team in place to do all that? Or do you still wanting to get involved?

Mr Suraj Gandha:

I think I still want to get involved.

One of my business partners, he's an older guy, he has run a ton of these different medical clinics and after-hours clinics and all sorts of things and he's taught me so much about the value of understanding the detail, right? So simple things like looking through the P & L every month very closely. If someone says, I want to make this change or that change, kind of understanding why and the second you take your hand off the business, it starts to get away from you a little bit and then practice managers make decisions that you don't understand, that may not necessarily be good for you for as a long-term business. It may be good in the short term but hurt in the long term. So, I like the idea of having my finger on the pulse and I also like the idea of having this long-term revenue stream. Hopefully, that will benefit my family when you know, we retire and don't have salary income anymore and maybe then I can sell it then. Like when you watch your parents get older, you realise it's good to have passive income because otherwise you've just got so much in the bank account every year kind of goes down unless you start selling stuff.

Steven Tait:

True. Now there's a lot of competition I guess in your industry, your space.

I mean, how you've lost some during COVID which obviously you've benefited from but there’s still some players out there. How do you define your value proposition to stand out amongst your competition?

Mr Suraj Gandha:

In terms of attracting patients, it's got to be the experience, right?

So, it's got to be easy to make a booking, it's got to be the quality doctor that you can trust and there's got to be staff who are friendly and willing to help you, these are the things that make the difference for us. The fact that we're in a great location and have lots of parking, and have allied health around so you can go to the GP and then to the physio and then for the pharmacy in one stop, which is not a new concept but it's kind of a bit unique for Newcastle. And they're our big value propositions just being convenient and efficient. In terms of doctors, I've already kind of talked about them, in terms of what makes it attractive for doctors and for our staff. Yeah, we need to focus a bit more on our staff because everyone's got knocked around during the pandemic. But hey, that's the biggest headaches I've got are staff.

Huyen Truong:

Yeah, it's always is.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

And they're the biggest influence.

Huyen Truong:

Assets.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Yeah, the biggest assets you've got.

We started taking review, our Google rating was like 2.3 out of five forever. And it looks awful when you look up a place to book and you're okay, I don't trust my kids’ health with that bunch. But what we started doing is sending out a text to review an hour after your consult and they're all positive, it's gone up to 4.3 or something and it's all praising the staff and praising this so you feedback that into the system as well. But the value proposition of someone being able to look at your Google review and say, all right, it's not going to get much better than that yeah, 4.3 is good.

Steven Tait:

That is good.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

So, we'll take it and you look at our competitors and they're all kind of languishing around the threes, they're rubbish.

Steven Tait:

Although it's an important point that you're making that just as a basic thing, it's very interesting that when you leave something like Google reviews to chance what you get and then when you are out there being proactive about trying to sort of manage that, it's amazing the difference that it can create for you.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Absolutely, they were all pretty negative reviews before because if you have a good experience, you just walk away and that's it but that basic lesson, I mean, you guys are probably experts in this.

Steven Tait:

You got to ask for it.

Mr Suraj Gandha:

Got to ask for it and you ask for it and you get it. If you don't like what you're getting you just turn it off.

Huyen Truong:     

Actually, we also have a system in place that if somebody leaves less than desirable star rating, let's say, three for example and then a signal is sent with a different message to the management team to deal with that particular review before it comes out to the public, so that's another way of managing reputation efficiently. So that's something we can help our practices in terms that are in place to manage their reputation better, more efficiently.

Now talking about another aspect is that we see repeatedly is that lots of clinics have failed over the years because they fail to adapt to changes, especially when the market changes as you can see what's happening right now with COVID-19. So how have you kept yourself nimble and flexible throughout 21 years of running your medical practice?

Mr Suraj Gandha:

I think we touched on a little bit before but I think it's reacting to crisis often helps. If nothing's happening, if nothing's going particularly well or particularly bad the natural tendency is just to sit there or go and find problems that aren't problems, just because you want to solve something because you're bored. So, a big challenge is looking out for the big things that are going to make a difference and doing something about it. Someone once told me as long as you're making decisions, then you're doing something right. They're not all going to be right but if you make little decisions all the time, you're probably going to get most of them right and you're not doing something that's so big that it's going to be a catastrophic failure to your practice. So, it comes back, I think to having your finger on the pulse a little bit to understand what's happening. I mean, in terms of big market shift dynamic, I don't think we get that in the GP industry. I think it happens slowly over time and it's more cultural in terms of patients, in technology than it is demographic. People still have the same things they had whatever 100 years ago, particularly now that we've had a pandemic too, come full circle, right. So, I think it's more being able to understand what's happening and if you see something getting a little bit off track, try to understand why, is it going to be a big influence? If it's not, don't worry about it otherwise try to bring it back to where you see your practice.

Steven Tait:

Suraj Gandha, thank you for joining us today.

This has been a very meaty conversation and you've given a lot of great sorts of insights and tips into what you guys are doing and a lot of great takeaways that our audience can use for themselves. And it is great seeing the perspective of someone outside of the medical space and how they approach running a GP practice so thank you for that.

And if you'd like to learn more tips and strategies on how to generate more leads and get more people to your clinic, I would recommend that you join our webinar the three must use strategies to generate more referrals and patients on autopilot.

Just spending one hour with us in that webinar will help you to master the fine art of bringing more patients and referrals to your clinic and generating more business for you. So, I will leave a link for that webinar in the show notes below.

Thank you very much again for joining us and thanks for tuning in. If you have any comments on the show

today, please leave them in the comment section below. Otherwise, we look forward to seeing you at the next show.

Huyen Truong:

Bye for now.

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